Spring on the Farm – 2019

Here are some views of the animals on the farm – goats, cows, pigs, calf, and chickens – and a look at the tulips, opened and closed.  Enjoy!

Pesch and Ralph
Firelight grazing
Wild Woman grazing
Spring piglets
Ted, the calf being raised to be an ox

 

The six chicks from the winter hatch
Closed tulips on a cool day
Open tulips on a sunny day

 

Starting Seeds

March is time to start some seeds! So far this year we have started tomatoes, gourds, and rosemary.

We built a little plant nursery in our basement a few years ago that we raise our plants in. A string of outdoor Christmas lights are in the bottom to keep the soil warm. And overhead lights are on a timer to simulate sunlight. The plastic tent covering can be peeled back into a large opening. This lets us soak everything well with a hand sprayer.

Hopefully these young tomato plants will be producing fruit later this summer.

Iatrogenic Issues

Late last fall we decided to re-try our hand at raising some goats. We bought a fine Nubian-Saanen cross, named Pesch, from farmers we know in Cortland County. She had been bred and expected to deliver in March.

Well, deliver she did…and along came kid number 1.

(Land mammals clean off their new babies by licking them off, so Mama is doing a good job here with her newborn.)

And then along came kid number 2.

(Baby 1 has its head up, which is a good sign. Within a couple of minutes she will be trying to stand up, although her legs will be too wobbly to support her.)

And the out popped kid number 3.

(Kid 3 was 15 – 20 minutes after Kid 1, so  the first little lady is already trying to figure out how to eat.)

All was going well with our three little kids. And then we tried to follow good veterinary  practice and gave them a booster shot of selenium and Vitamin E. Unfortunately, we got our dosage wrong and thus we arrive at our iatrogenic issue. Two of the kids reacted to the overdose and ended up dying.

It was a sad re-introduction to raising goats, but we are glad that we have one little guy (the kids call him Ralph) that jumps around the pen playing with Mama.

Tax Time at the Nerve Center

March 23 – Once upon a time (heigh-ho, the dairy-o) the Farmer took a wife.

The Farmer’s Wife not only gets to cook all the great farm food, but also helps keep track of farm records. This is in addition to volunteering for her church, working part-time for a small homeschool curriculum producer, homeschooling her children, and maintaining a household.

And the big push now is to get our tax forms done.

Here is The Farmer’s Wife’s Nerve Center. Does that look like organized chaos? Well, if The Farmer posted a picture of his work area, you would see complete chaos.

April 8 – And taxes are done, submitted, and accepted! YEA!!!